One Million Books

January 20th, 2015

There are mileposts in every writer’s career, I suppose.  Getting an agent.  Getting a publisher.  Getting that first book into stores and into readers’ hands.  I could go on and on, because a writer’s career is simply a journey, and although every journey doesn’t have an identifiable destination, it seems to me they all must have moments that mark progress.

One Million Books

So here’s a recent one for me: According to my publisher, sometime in the past few weeks, I sold my one-millionth novel.  Bells didn’t chime.  No fireworks.  I didn’t even pop a cork on a bottle of champagne.  In the grand scheme, it’s probably not much.  But for a guy who began by wanting only to write a story good enough that someone might actually want to read it, well, this is a pretty big deal.  And also, it’s an opportunity to say thank you to all of you out there who bought one of my books (or two or three) and made this milestone possible.  We all need friends on our journeys, and I’m so glad to have you with me.

The Quiet Horizon

January 1st, 2015

As another year is about to sink completely into the realm of memory, I can’t help but look back and marvel. I couldn’t have asked for, hoped for, or even, if I’d been able, crafted for myself a better twelve months. It’s been filled with the fruit of many labors. An old book greatly honored, a new book warmly received, and the contours of a future book roughly completed. Specifically, Ordinary Grace received an incredible number of accolades: the Edgar, the Anthony, the Barry, the Macavity, the Dilys, the Squid, the Silver Falchion. Windigo Island, the fourteenth entry in my Cork O’Connor series, appeared on a number of best books of the year lists. And the first draft of This Tender Land, the companion novel to Ordinary Grace, was finished. If one of the things that keeps us vital is steeping ourselves in the work we love, then it has been a year of great vitality and great passion.

As I look ahead now, what do I see? 2015 will be a quiet year in many respects. I will have no novel published in the upcoming year, so no long book tours, no long periods that will take me away from home and family. I’m looking forward to months and months of peace, of uninterrupted writing, of simply catching my breath. In each of the last three years, I’ve scheduled more than a hundred events—signings, author talks, workshops, conferences. This year will be different, blessedly calm, filled with quiet, I hope, the kind of quiet that allows deep contemplation to become possible, the kind of quiet that feeds our souls.

In terms of the writing itself, for those of you who are interested, this is what I’ll be working on. I will polish This Tender Land and prepare it for publication in the spring of 2016. I will complete the next in the Cork O’Connor series, a novel I’ve just begun to outline, and that will probably also appear in 2016. And I will begin work on a short novel, an idea that has been knocking around in my brain for more than a decade. So, clearly, I won’t be idle.

Every year is different from those that have come before. Although I have plans, I don’t really know what to expect. Life has a way of surprising us, doesn’t it?

And so, I wish every one of you the best on your own journey in the year ahead. May your days be filled with vitality, with passion, with love. And also with that blessed quiet that will feed your soul.

A few 2014 highlights:

William Kent Krueger
January: What exciting news! Ordinary Grace has received a nomination for the Edgar Award for Best Novel! I couldn’t be happier for this book, which is so different from those in my Cork O’Connor series that I was afraid no one would be interested in publishing or reading it. I’m tremendously grateful to Atria Books for having supported Ordinary Grace from the outset. So very grateful to the independent booksellers who made sure that the novel got into the hands of readers. And especially grateful to all of those out there who read the story and embraced it. Now, to pop the cork on a bottle of champagne!

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February: In my books, I write a lot about cold weather. I’m often asked if I believe you should write what you know. Definitely. Here I am with my wife, Diane, in our backyard. Yeah, like every Minnesotan, I understand winter pretty well. And understand, too, why the ancients used to have all kinds of orgiastic celebrations when spring finally came.

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March: Driving cross-country from the Tucson Festival of the Book to Left Coast Crime in Monterey. Had to hit the National Parks along the way. What treasures! Here I am in Sequoia National Park, just a few minutes from viewing the famous trees.

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April: I’m in Grand Rapids for the Festival of Faith and Writing at Calvin College. I’m here with two thousand other attendees from all over this continent. This is one of the most amazing conferences at which I’ve been asked to present. The list of stellar authors across a broad range of disciplines is incredible. The focus, of course, is how faith informs our writing, but it touches on so many significant aspects of our lives. It is, quite frankly, knocking my socks off. (Photo taken at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum)

Edgar and Me
May: I couldn’t be happier having won the Edgar Award for my novel Ordinary Grace. In so many ways, it feels like the culmination of a lot of years of hard work. Not just the writing of a dozen plus novels, but all the ceaseless labor to get those books into readers’ hands. When I was given the award at the ceremony in New York City, the meat of my acceptance was simply this: “To write, to be published, to be read, to be appreciated. What more could any storyteller ask for?”

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August: I’m at Killer Nashville, which has just become my new favorite mystery conference! As a guest of honor, I received a stunning black Fender guitar. Here I am with Clay Stafford, founder of Killer Nashville and all-around great guy, living it up with my new Fender.

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August: When you do a signing in northern Minnesota, you never know who might be looking over your shoulder. One of Bullwinkle’s relatives dropped in on my signing at Piragis Northwoods Company in Ely and just had to stick his big nose between me and store manager Jordyn Nyquist.

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September: I’ve taken a couple of days off from the book tour to volunteer at our church dining hall at the fabulous Minnesota State Fair. Here I am working the food line—hot steam table on a hot day!—with my lovely wife. One of the things I appreciate about the dining hall is that for every meal someone buys there, our church donates a meal to Save My Starving Children, a great non-profit organization that helps feed hungry children around the globe. Food, fun, fellowship, and a worthy cause—what could be better!

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September: So, here I am among the brewing vats at the Excelsior Brewing Company for what was one of the most unique signing venues I’ve ever experienced. I talked to a very large audience, all of us pressed between these stainless steel behemoths and the serving counter. We drank really good beer, I talked really loud, and honest to God, we had a great time of it. Beer and books, a combination ordained in heaven.

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September: In Europe for the very first time! Sunset on the Danube.

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November: At Bouchercon in Long Beach. On my right, the Macavity. On my left, the Barry. Aren’t they lovely?

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December: I finished the first draft of the companion novel to Ordinary Grace. When published, it will be titled This Tender Land. Oh God, I think it’s good. A lot of revision still to be done, but I believe I’ll pop the cork on a bottle of champagne and allow myself a little celebration of this milepost. Cheers!

Advantages of a Real Book

October 21st, 2014

I’m often asked what I think of e-books and e-readers (e.g., Nook, Kindle, Kobo).  My answer has always been a rather emotional argument in favor of the real thing, a book made of paper, with a real cover and real pages.  My line of thinking has always gone something like this: You can fall in love with a story on an e-reader.  But you have a love affair with a book.  It’s a very sensual and, to my way of thinking, more meaningful experience.

Well, now science is backing me up.  An article by Rachel Grate, published on the Arts.Mic website, reports findings in many studies that suggest reading a real book offers a multitude of healthy benefits, physically and emotionally, that e-reading does not.  For example, readers of real books remember much better what they’ve read.  Reading a real book reduces stress.  And people who read real books tend to be more empathetic in their response to the adversity of others than those who stick with e-books.

Check it out: http://mic.com/articles/99408/science-has-great-news-for-people-who-read-actual-books

Then visit your local independent bookseller and stock up one of life’s greatest elixirs—the written word.

One Book, One Community

August 1st, 2014

Oh, what a wonderful time we all had on July 30 at the South Lake Minnetonka One Book-One Community event. This was the first event of its kind for which Ordinary Grace has been chosen. The community center was filled to capacity. The audience was warm and receptive. The atmosphere was festive. I was, of course, grateful that everyone had gathered to hear about my book, but I was just as pleased with the whole idea of an entire community engaged in the reading and discussing of a single work of literature, whatever that book might be and whoever the author.

Here are some photos of the event. The bevy of attractive and intelligent women surrounding me in this photo is the BFW (Books, Food, and Wine) book group. What a delight they were!

BFW Book Group

And the lovely ladies with me in the second photo are the creative, hardworking folks who made the event such a success—L. to R. Sharon Noble, Peggy Bauer, Pamela Klinger-Horn, and Ellie Temple (of Excelsior Bay Books!).

Kent with Event Organizers

Ordinary Grace will be featured in a number of one book-one community read programs throughout the rest of 2014. Check my calendar for the places and times. I hope you can join us for one of the celebrations. I promise you they’ll be a hoot!

Excelsior Audience

Lost in Translation?

July 21st, 2014

My novels have been translated into many languages, none of which I can read.  I always wonder if meaning gets mangled in the process.  I’ll probably never know for sure, but a look at what translating has done to some of my book titles might provide a clue.  Here are some of my books with the titles they were given by my foreign publishers.  What a hoot!

Blood Hollow…..The Girl Who Died Twice (Japan)

Boundary Waters…..The Snows of Death (French)
Boundary Waters…..Night Trembling Wolf (Japanese)

Heaven’s Keep…..The Devil’s Mountain (Italian)
Heaven’s Keep…..The Citadel of God (Portugese)
(Two different approaches suggesting, it seems to me, two entirely different books!)

William Kent Krueger books in translation

Iron Lake…..Native American Winter (German)
Iron Lake…..The Whisper of the Wendigo (Spanish)
Iron Lake…..The Forest of Ice (Italian)

Thunder Bay…..The Spirit of the Beast (Finnish)
Thunder Bay…..Roar of Blood (Japanese)

Purgatory Ridge French editionOne of the titles that most mystified me at first, and then pleased me immensely is from the French edition of Purgatory Ridge.  It’s sold under the title À L’Heure où Blanchit la Campagne.  The Google translator gives me this: At the Time When the Countryside Whitens.  Suggesting snow, maybe?  “But”—my first thought was—“this story takes place in one of the hottest summers on record in northern Minnesota.”  Then my really brilliant media maven Sue Trowbridge enlightened me.  The title is a quote taken from a rather famous passage by Victor Hugo.  I’m quite happy to have one of my own pieces associated, even in a small way, with the work of such a literary giant.

If anyone has read any of my books in a translated language, oh would I love to hear from you and get your take on how well the story came through the process.